aegee-budapest – AEGEE-Europe | European Students' Forum AEGEE (Association des Etats Généraux des Etudiants de l’Europe / European Students’ Forum) is a student organisation that promotes cooperation, communication and integration amongst young people in Europe. As a non-governmental, politically independent, and non-profit organisation AEGEE is open to students and young people from all faculties and disciplines – today it counts 13 000 members, active in close to 200 university cities in 40 European countries, making it the biggest interdisciplinary student association in Europe. Wed, 15 Nov 2017 17:59:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.5.11 Do you want to “Get involved”? AEGEE-Budapest knows how! /do-you-want-to-get-involved-aegee-budapest-knows-how/ Thu, 09 Mar 2017 17:20:05 +0000 /?p=7023 By Ákos Glaub

AEGEE-Budapest is the winner of this year’s Franck Biancheri Award with the “Education for the Present, Democracy for the Future” Conference, which will be the opening conference of EoT4. AEGEE-Budapest is strongly committed to this edition’s topic, Civic Education, carrying out their local project “Get involved”. Get to know more about this interesting project thanks to AEGEE-Budapest president:20170221_181004181_CAM

Our latest event organized by AEGEE-Budapest’s very own „Get Involved!” Project explored the topic of populism. Approximately 50 students from different universities and academic fields attended the event. The discussion was part of the lecture series preceding the Franck Biancheri Award winner Conference “Education for the present, Democracy for the future” organized in April by the Budapest antenna, the Civic Education Working Group and the Europe on Track Project.

After two successful events examining the current political state of Turkey and the integration of refugees20170221_191120106_CAM the Project chose another actual and relevant subject. During a round table discussion our invited experts (Ádám Paár and Ágoston Mráz, political scientists, and Zoltán Farkas,a journalist) explored what populism really means, how people and the media use the term, thus we got to know the origins of the expression.

Furthermore, the audience could get to know the reasons why populism is so wide-spread nowadays, how it has become mainstream, and what are its effects on politics. Besides describing possible outcomes and future trends, the questions of the audience were answered and discussed.

All in all, the event brought us a closer look and better understanding of populism, a word and a trend that influences the political atmosphere all around the globe these days.

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Open Call for Ambassadors for the 2017 edition! /open-call-for-ambassadors-for-the-2017-edition/ Mon, 02 Jan 2017 09:11:04 +0000 /?p=6992 Have you ever wished to just drop everything and jump on a train? Are you passionate about society and eager to explore other countries to find out what people actually think?

Then keep reading about this once in a lifetime opportunity!

AEGEE, one of the biggest european student organizations, is looking for 6 young, enthusiastic and proactive people willing to go on a one-month adventure across Europe. In collaboration with InterRail and the European Citizens’ Initiative ‘More than Education’(ECI), the Ambassadors will enquire about the current status of civic education in the different countries they are going to visit and address, through discussions and workshops, young people’s realities, aspirations and visions for the future of Europe.

The trip will start after a kick-off conference in Budapest taking place from the 21st to the 23rd of April, organised in collaboration with AEGEE-Budapest, the Association des Amis de Franck Biancheri and the Civic Education Working Group. The journey will finish on the 23d of May at Agora Enschede 2017.

Practical info:

There will be two teams travelling through two different routes, each of them will be composed of a writer/interviewer, a photographer and a videomaker.

Requirements to be eligible to apply:

  • being between 18 and 30 years old, as of April 17, 2017;
  • being active in a (international) student organization or non-profit organisation with a civic education-related mission;
  • feeling strong ties to Europe;
  • being able to talk and work with people of different ages and cultures;
  • have consistent travel experience and an international mindset;
  • being responsible and reliable;
  • have a can-do and up-for-anything attitude;
  • being resistant to stress and physical fatigue;
  • being able to take initiative;
  • have an open mind!

Expected tasks:

  • administer quantitative questionnaires and conduct and record qualitative interviews;
  • deliver workshops;
  • increase people’s awareness on the importance of civic education and how to improve its current state;
  • promote the ‘More than Education’ ECI by collecting signatures;

You will find additional information and the requirements for the specific positions in the following form:

APPLY HERE by the 3rd of Feburary!

For any questions do not hesitate in contacting us at europeontrack@aegee.org or through the Facebook page.

europeontrack

 

 

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Europe on Track is back! /europe-on-track-is-back-2/ Fri, 30 Dec 2016 09:45:16 +0000 /?p=6990 Dear AEGEEans,

Since you ratified us as an official AEGEE-Europe project at Agora Bergamo 2016, we are working really hard to organise a fantastic 4th edition of Europe on Track. Now we will announce dates and topic of EoT4 and later this week we will launch the open call for both hosting antennas and travel ambassadors.

First of all, we are pleased to announce that, in collaboration with AEGEE-Budapest and the Civic Education Working Group, we are the winners of the Franck Biancheri Award. This means that we will be opening EoT4 with a conference in Budapest from April 21-23 and from there the ambassadors will start their race through Europe on-rail for a month until we wave the finishing flag at Agora Enschede on May 23

The topic of EoT4 will be Civic Education and we will collaborate with the the Civic Education Working Group and the European Citizens’ Initiative “More than Education”.

Why Civic Education?
Civic Education is learning the competencies, i.e. skills, knowledge and attitudes, required to be an active, democratic and responsible citizen. Its ultimate goal is to educate the population on democratic citizenship and make them aware of their rights and responsibilities.Civic Education aims at fostering a culture of active participation and responsibility among citizens.

We believe Civic Education is important because in a democracy we are supposed to hold the decision makers accountable, however we are not adequately trained to do so. This leaves the citizens with a lack of understanding, and subsequently a lack of democratic control and appreciation. Civic Education is one of the most important learning tools at our disposal, as it allows people to become informed and independent individuals in society. It is an education based on critical thinking, democratic participation and a common understanding of certain values and principles

EoT4 aims to understand what civic education and civic responsibility mean to you. This in turn will help AEGEE to understand how to reach out to people in order to build an active citizenship.

Why else is this important for us?
We want to empower young people to fight for better Civic Education in their countries. Moreover, one of the aims of the current Strategic Plan is to put Civic Education on the political agenda on all levels and this is not a goal of one working group but of AEGEE as a whole. We believe Europe on Track can make this happen. Lastly, we would like to send the ambassadors to high schools as well, wherever possible, in order to increase the impact of the project and ensure broader reach of our message.

Happy holidays and we look forward to working with you in 2017!
Europe on Track team

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More unity, more solidarity, more European identity /more-unity-more-solidarity-more-european-identity/ Mon, 09 May 2016 07:27:44 +0000 /?p=6507 By Hanna Polishchuk

During our stop in Hungary, we had the opportunity to ask young people what they think about the European Union, borders and the refugee crisis. We would like to share with you some interesting answers we received from Péter Sczigel, 22, Hungarian, Student and the President of AEGEE-Budapest and Màtè Bàlint, 24 ,Hungarian,  Analyst of the Central Bank of Hungary. They both have international experience, and travelled to other countries for different reasons. We asked them how easy it was for them to cross European borders.

Do you feel borders in Europe? If yes which ones?

Péter: Yes, both physical and mental. Outside the Schengen area borders are still very real, but I think that the biggest problem is that even inside Schengen most people still have a mental concept of borders between their country and the rest of Europe that really limits their thinking.

Did you have any difficulties crossing borders?

Màtè: I did not have to apply for anything, I could pass to other countries without borders. So, it was easy.DSC_9966 (1)

Do you feel European?

Péter: Absolutely.

Màtè: I feel Hungarian and European as well. It is a hard question, maybe more Hungarian than European, but I would need more time to decide that,it’s not a clear idea in my mind yet.

Do you think that the European Union should extend or decrease?

Màtè: Well, I can’t think about the size, I have read that it will be expanded a little, including the Balkans, and some countries will join. There is also a plan for Turkey, but it is not decided yet. However, as far as I know it won’t expand, especially to the East. Now the composition of the countries and cultural differences is very fresh, so it would be really risky to expand it more.

Accession negotiations of Turkey (about joining the EU) started in 2005. What do you think are the reasons behind such a long process?

Péter: Because European people are reluctant to have a country with Muslim majority in Europe. Also, regarding the culture, Turkey is very different from Europe and due to its enormous population, Turkey would get a big proportion of votes in the European decision-making mechanisms, which is something that no one in Europe actually wants.

Do you think there is a refugee crisis in Europe? What is the refugee situation in Hungary? Do you feel safe in your country?

Màtè: Well, I know that there is a fence, and that they set the border, which according to what one of the parties in the government says, has a gate, and people who come peacefully and who are proven refugees can come. But the opposition said that it is a closed gate, and no one can come in: there is a fence and people who come there should go home. It is really hard to decide which is the case because I have not been there.

Right now, there are no refugees in Hungary because those who came in passed through, and then the borders were closed. As far as I know, refugees stopped in Turkey and did not go further because there were some caps for them. The European Union made an agreement with Turkey about this issue. Right now no one comes, and even if they came, there is a fence in Hungary; it is like a double security.

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From the Hungarian side, I think it is important to accept refugees in an organized way so that people could not come to the Schengen area and just travel inside. Europe is a very fresh alliance, and it should not expand more because it would be too risky. Another point is that the fact that people can travel and come in without any IDs tempers social security because they would feel that they do not have any supervision.

Péter: Yes, there definitely is. The situation is not very serious in Hungary, as most refugees do not want to live here but rather move through the country to get to Western Europe. However, the refugee crisis provided a great political capital to the government, which communicated the situation in order to achieve their political goals. I absolutely feel safe, but I wouldn’t feel threatened even if Hungary was a major refugee destination.

What would you wish for the future of Europe?

Màtè: I think Europe should not jump from one idea to the opposite one, exaggerating one point or the other. In my opinion, the answer for questions like these, which separate people so much, is somewhere in the middle. And if you look at the European history, you can see that extremist ideas obviously led to bad decisions.

Péter: More unity, more solidarity, more European identity, less nationalism, less conservatism.

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Team Blue: Hungary is not as closed as we think nowadays! /is-hungary-as-closed-as-we-perceive-it-nowadays/ Sun, 01 May 2016 11:17:23 +0000 /?p=6441 By Hanna Polishchuk

One more long train journey directly from Warsaw to the capital of Hungary was ahead of us. However, with Interrail trains it was comfortable and light. This time we decided to sleep in the train almost all the way to get more energy for the evening. Agi from AEGEE-Budapest met us in the train station, and we went to her home. Together with Mate they prepared a tasty traditional Hungarian dish.

WSW-BDP

The day after, we met other members of this wonderful local (Peti, Bernadett and Dorottya) who took us to the outdoor session. We were walking through the beautiful streets of Budapest, passing by architectural masterpieces, green parks and astonishing university, which made us exclaim “Wooooow!”

The Corvinus University opened its doors for us to reveal the secret of why this local has so many active members. Every place we passed had a poster of the Summer University project, it was literally everywhere, we felt like in the AEGEE headquarters!

During the next couple of hours we were watching a Hungarian movie that raised the questions and problems young people are facing in their lives, ‘For Some Inexplicable Reason’. We highly recommend it to those who have not watched it yet!

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The day after, we had the workshop at the same university. This time we concentrated on the debating part. Participants were divided into two groups from which one is in favour of borderless Europe, and another one is against. Their task was to persuade their opponents with facts. Both teams had well-structured arguments, and both sides were quite convincing.

Those debates could be going on forever, but at some point we needed to stop them in order to make a decision. Even though both teams were fighting to defend their side, later the task was changed and they had to express their own opinion. As a result, most of them voted in favour of abolishing borders. We all agreed that it was not easy to make decisions, and this is what politicians in the EU are doing every day, affecting the life of each of us. Our views over some questions, such as borders split up, probably because it was an international meeting that included not only Hungarians but also participants from Turkey, Serbia, Ukraine and Italy. It seems that Budapest is indeed an international city.

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During the interviews and discussions, young Hungarians expressed their concerns about the problems such as xenophobia, bureaucracy, corruption and nationalism. There is not enough information about refugees; people complain about them but in fact, almost no one of them has ever met any.

Another problem is that not many people are aware about youth mobility opportunities and they miss them because of the poor information they have. Hungarians believe that if youth is more aware of them, more people will participate in cultural exchange projects and the cooperation between countries will be better. However, we didn’t hear only problems, but also solutions such as better institutions, no prejudices, acceptance of different cultures, breaking stereotypes, supporting national minorities, and being more efficient in implementing the basic idea of the EU. These solutions are not hard to implement but if we do it, it will bring more peace to the society.

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We want to thank AEGEE-Budapest, and especially Peter Sczigel,  for the opportunity to participate in this event and learn about the opinion of the Hungarian (and not only) youth about very important issues like borders, Shengen, refugees and the EU in general. I personally have to admit that I was astonished by the answers and debates during the event. I am sure if we had such politicians, the world would be better!

Please keep changing the future, don’t be afraid to express your opinion and fight for a better reality.

Thanks for welcoming us, the city tour, sessions, food, accommodation, and all sort of help you gave us! We were lucky to take part in this event organized by the AEGEE-Budapest!

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